Growing A Garden

There is nothing more heartwarming to me than watching my daughter learn and grow. I could compare her to a wildflower or maybe a prickly but sweet raspberry plant, but guys… she’s a whole dang garden. And everyone else is too.

Her second birthday is right around the corner and I’ve picked up some gardening supplies and little book about gardening for her as a gift. I am beyond excited for her to receive them and help start the upcoming season’s growth. Though almost two, she is no stranger to harvesting goodies from our garden or getting covered in dirt.

Last year, we planted a wildflower garden for her. We gave out seeds as a party favor for her first birthday (a tradition we will carry on this year) and planted any of the leftover seeds. She’d help me water them every day and patiently wait to stomp in the puddles as the water seeped from the bottom of the flower pot.

While watering her flowers last year, a beautiful white butterfly began floating around and her pure little one year old soul simply said “hi.” She wanted to strike up conversation with a butterfly. This purity with nature is the very basis of what I want to instill in her.

When our vegetables took growth, her ready little hands would help me harvest the morning picks – sometimes a little prematurely. She’s quick when it comes to tomato picking, so we had a fair share of green tomatoes sitting in the windowsill soaking up sun and trying to ripen without their vine. She loved it every bit of it. She’d even do a little happy dance as we headed outside every single day.

If you look at her bookcase, you’ll see a lot of nature, farming, and gardening books. This is no mistake. If I teach her anything it’ll be that nature is the most important thing in life and learning to grow your own vegetables is one of the greatest gifts you can give to yourself.

My dream is that even if she becomes a busy career woman or a stay at mom is that she’ll always have a certain respect for nature. I want Reduce, Reuse, and Recycle to be apart of her daily life. I pray that she is never the type to litter. I hope she has respect and love for all animals, plants, and trees.

Gardening, even at such an early age, is a beautiful introduction to nature. It teaches her patience and shows her that all things start small. A small seed can one day be a huge oak tree. I want her to learn that the world is ever-changing and you can grow through anything that you go through.

It’s a lesson I hope she learns young, but for those of you who are adults, it’s still a lesson you can adapt into yourselves. You don’t have to start gardening or talking to butterflies. Just start with 5 minutes a day to really stop and appreciate nature and all that it has to offer.

Grow through what you go through